Watch: Military twin sisters from Minnesota surprise brother at college football game - Bring Me The News

Watch: Military twin sisters from Minnesota surprise brother at college football game

He was overcome with emotion when he saw them waiting for him.
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From left: Destinee, Tre, Daizjah, Laila (the youngest of the bunch)

From left: Destinee, Tre, Daizjah, Laila (the youngest of the bunch)

Twin sisters Daizjah and Destinee Morris took advantage of a rare break at West Point and made it back to Minnesota so they could join the rest of their family on a trip to watch their younger brother play football at the University of South Dakota. 

The thing is, their younger brother, Tre Morris, a redshirt freshman offensive lineman, had no idea they were coming – and his mom, Bernice, and dad, Jeremy, caught it all on camera

The twins play basketball for Army

Daizjah and Destinee are on the Army women's basketball team, which has been incredibly successful in the Patriot League, posting a combined record of 51-12 over the last two seasons, including a trip to the NCAA Tournament two years ago.

Destinee led Army in 3-point shooting last season while averaging 25 minutes off the bench. Daizjah, a defensive standout, started all 31 games and led the team in steals.

All of the Morris siblings attended Centennial High School in the Twin Cities.

Here's where the story gets even better

"The twins had been telling Tre that they would probably never see him play because once they graduate, they will have active duty military requirements that could take them away from home, even overseas, for extended periods of time," Jeremy Morris explained to GoMN. 

That's true. Simply getting away from the demands at West Point is difficult. 

"It is always difficult for them to come home due to their rigorous year-round schedule as a West Point cadet, but when you throw in that they are also Division I basketball players, it makes it even more difficult – especially through the holidays," Jeremy told GoMN. 

"On average, they may get less than five days for Christmas, no Thanksgiving, and no spring break," he added. "They are unable to come home on long weekends between November and March, which is what made this surprise visit so special."

Side note: Jeremy Morris is a good friend of mine and the co-host of the GoMN: One Hunnit Podcast

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