Skip to main content

Great Lakes

duluth ship fire

Duluth fire crews battle blaze on 118-year-old lake freighter

The J.B. Ford, which is the oldest intact lake freighter still floating, has been housed at a scrapyard since 2015.

Scientists say Asian carp could spread through all Great Lakes in 20 years

A risk analysis by U.S. and Canadian researchers finds the food supply and breeding areas in the Great Lakes would allow Asian carp to spread rapidly. The report says just ten breeding females and a few males would be enough of a foothold for the invasive fish to populate all five of the Great Lakes.

States won't back off lawsuit aimed at keeping Asian carp out of Great Lakes

Last month Congress made changes to shorten the timeframe for developing a federal plan to prevent the invasive fish from spreading to the Great Lakes. But Minnesota and four other states that are suing the federal government over the issue say they won't withdraw the lawsuit.

Duluth cyclists halfway on Great Lakes journey

Kris McNeal, 26, and Zach Chase, 25, are heading back to Minnesota after passing the 3,000-mile mark on their mission to encircle all five of the Great Lakes. The University of Minnesota Duluth graduates started their 5,300-mile trek in May and plan to return home in early August. The Duluth News Tribune notes the two men also made a 1,700-mile bicycle trek along the West Coast in 2008.

Feds agree to shorter timeline for developing Asian carp strategy

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it will come up with a short list of options for blocking the spread of the invasive fish by the end of next year. The Corps had earlier said the process would take until 2015. Asian carp have already invaded the Mississippi River watershed. Officials hope to keep them from migrating into the Great Lakes.

Obama officials, states reach deal to speed approval of Great Lakes wind farms

Minnesota is one of five states to sign on to a deal with White House officials that will speed up the regulatory process for offshore wind farms. The deal comes with some controversy: Critics worry offshore turbines would harm wildlife, lower property values and spoil scenic vistas. Supporters say they will mean new jobs, more homegrown energy and less pollution.