marriage amendment

Blank ballots could seal fate of marriage amendment

After so many fierce debates, months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, the marriage amendment could be decided by people who leave the question blank on their ballots, MPR reports. A blank ballot counts as a "no" vote on the question of whether a marriage should be defined in the state constitution as between a man and woman. To be approved, the measure needs 50 percent of voters to vote "yes."

Will amendment battles swing results for other races?

Two fights over voter IDs and gay marriage have divided the state, sparked fierce debates across Minnesota and led to more than $20 million in spending by supporters and opponents. Now another question remains: Will voter turnout for those two ballot measures affect the outcome of other races?

Ritchie: Expect delayed election results

Minnesota's Secretary of State Mark Ritchie told WCCO on Sunday that St. Louis County could delay statewide Election Day results more than previous elections. Ritchie said three write-in candidates looking to replace former state Rep. Kerry Gauthier will have to be hand counted. “We estimate that this may go to 1 a.m., 2 a.m., perhaps a little bit longer, in the morning,” he said.

Pioneer Press editorial on marriage amendment draws criticism

The Pioneer Press published an editorial Saturday on various views surrounding the proposed marriage amendment in Minnesota. In the article, the paper claims they "are not endorsing one way or another," but many are claiming the piece very clearly takes a side. One of them is Vikings punter Chris Kluwe, who says he will no longer contribute blogs to the paper.

Clergy busy during final weekend of campaign for, against marriage amendment

Religious leaders are at the forefront of the final weekend of campaigning for and against the marriage amendment on Tuesday's ballot. More than 500 Christian leaders with the group Minnesota Pastors For Marriage released a statement in support of the amendment that would Constitutionally define marriage as an opposite sex union. Opponents planned a worship service followed by the blessing of a "Minnesota Votes No Tour" that will travel the state until Election Day.

Marriage amendment combatants raise more than $15M

The battle over the marriage amendment may be the most expensive fight ever in Minnesota over a ballot initiative, the Star Tribune reports. Even actor Brad Pitt has donated money. Opponents of the measure raised more than $10 million, and supporters raised about $5 million. Supporters of the other ballot measure, a constitutional amendment that would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, raised about $1.5 million, and opponents raked in $2.6 million.

Millions raised in final stretch of marriage amendment fight

Minnesotans United for All Families, the driving force behind the campaign to defeat the proposed marriage amendment, raised $3 million from Sept. 19 to Oct. 22. The group's main opponent, Minnesotans for Marriage, says they raised about $2.4 million in the same time period.

Cash floods into amendment campaigns

In just the last three days, nearly $1 million has been funneled into the campaigns on both sides of the two constitutional amendments on Minnesota's Election Day ballot, the Star Tribune reports. Among the donations, the Minnesota Family Council gave $500,000 to the effort supporting the amendment that would effectively ban gay marriage.

Marriage amendment allies, foes target black voters

Black voters in Minnesota are the latest audience sought by opponents and supporters of marriage amendment, the Star Tribune reports. The president of the national NAACP was in the state Monday to urge black voters to reject the ballot measure that would ban gay marriage. Church leaders are divided.

Kluwe takes on empty chair in marriage debate, Tom Barnard moderates

Vikings punter Chris Kluwe debated Minnesota's controversial marriage amendment Friday night at the Brave New Workshop in downtown Minneapolis, the Star Tribune reports. Tom Barnard, a popular KQRS radio personality, played the role of moderator. Kluwe invited several supporters of the ballot measure to ban same-sex marriage in the state, including former Vikings center Matt Birk and Congresswoman Michele Bachmann, but no one agreed to the debate.

Debate intensifies as marriage vote nears

The war over marriage in Minnesota has reached all corners of the state. Some dispatches from the front: Pro-amendment signs were vandalized at a Bemidji church. A local Ely newspaper owner says gay couples can take their wedding announcements elsewhere. And high-profile GOP operative Michael Brodkorb – among the very strategists who helped get the amendment on the ballot – says he will vote no.

Klobuchar solicits money for marriage amendment fight

With a healthy lead in the polls, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., is spending some of her political capital in the divisive fight over the marriage amendment. In a new email to potential donors, Klobuchar says she has pledged to help raise $10,000 for the fight against the controversial state ballot measure that would define marriage as between a man and woman.

New poll shows Minnesotans evenly divided on both amendments

The marriage and voter ID amendments need the support of a majority of Minnesotans who vote in November to become part of the state Constitution. The latest poll shows the marriage amendment supported by 49 percent of respondents, while 51 percent back the voter ID measure.

400,000 Catholics asked to help pay for marriage amendment ads

With just weeks to go before a vote in Minnesota on a ballot measure that would ban gay marriage, state bishops in a letter to Minnesota Catholics this week are asking them to contribute to Minnesota for Marriage, the leading pro-amendment group, the Star Tribune reports. It's an unusually direct and explicit ask of the church's faithful, one observer says.

Backers of marriage amendment say opponents engage in stalking, harassment

Supporters of the marriage amendment say a social media tool being used by opponents amounts to harassment. It allows Facebook users to identify and contact friends who might plan to vote in favor of the Constitutional amendment, which would ban same-sex marriage. Users of the Facebook tool say it's no different than a conventional phone bank.

Group against marriage amendment airs first TV ad

The group Minnesotans United for All Families, the leading opponent of a ballot measure that would ban gay marriage, has released its first TV ad in the Twin Cities and Duluth. It features a Catholic, Republican couple from Savage who opposes the measure.