voter ID

Stunner: Voter ID amendment fails

In a shocking upset, the voter ID amendment has failed, and by a sizable margin. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, the "no" votes led by nearly 8 percentage points, MPR says. The measure would have amended the state constitution to require voters to bring photo IDs to the polls.

Polls: Support softens for both amendments

Two new polls show more survey respondents oppose the marriage amendment than support it. One poll, for the first time, shows a majority of respondents also oppose the voter ID amendment.

Marriage amendment vote close; voter ID likely to pass

A new KSTP/SurveyUSA poll shows the battle between supporters and opponents of a ballot measure that would ban gay marriage could result in the closest statewide race on Election Day. The survey shows 48 percent support the amendment that would define marriage as between a man and woman, and 47 percent oppose it.

Marriage amendment combatants raise more than $15M

The battle over the marriage amendment may be the most expensive fight ever in Minnesota over a ballot initiative, the Star Tribune reports. Even actor Brad Pitt has donated money. Opponents of the measure raised more than $10 million, and supporters raised about $5 million. Supporters of the other ballot measure, a constitutional amendment that would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, raised about $1.5 million, and opponents raked in $2.6 million.

Gov. Dayton, former Gov. Arne Carlson appear in new ad

A new ad against the proposed amendment that would require voters to use a government-issued ID at the polls takes a bipartisan approach. Our Vote Our Future began airing the 30-second ad Friday featuring Gov. Mark Dayton, a Democrat, and former Gov. Arne Carlson. a Republican.

Group: Voter ID requirement hurts Native Americans

A tribal advocacy group says new voter identification laws in a dozen states hinder the ability of some Native Americans to vote, the Associated Press reports. Among the issues is that some homes in tribal communities have no addresses, a new report says. The study cites other issues: "barriers of cost, logistics and distance to obtaining required IDs."

Foes of photo ID measure unleash first TV ad

Our Vote Our Future, a coalition of groups that opposes the proposed photo ID constitutional amendment, has begun running a 30-second TV spot featuring Democrat Joan Growe, who was Minnesota's Secretary of State from 1975 to 1999, the Star Tribune reports.

Plenty of questions to be answered if Voter ID amendment passes

Estimates of how much it will cost to implement a voter ID requirement at Minnesota polling places range from a few million dollars to $100 million. The cost is among many details that state lawmakers will need to fill in if residents approve a Constitutional amendment requiring a government-issued ID to vote.

If voter ID law passes, then what? Details at issue

Passage of the voter ID constitutional amendment next month would require Minnesotans to bring a government-issued photo identification to the polls when they vote, beginning in 2013. But the devil is in the details. The Pioneer Press reports that critics say the specifics still aren't clear – what kind of ID, what happens if you don’t have one, how much it would cost and who pays? The 2013 Legislature could be left to sort it out.

New poll shows Minnesotans evenly divided on both amendments

The marriage and voter ID amendments need the support of a majority of Minnesotans who vote in November to become part of the state Constitution. The latest poll shows the marriage amendment supported by 49 percent of respondents, while 51 percent back the voter ID measure.

Group fighting Voter ID amendment issues cost estimates

A group opposed to the Voter ID Constitutional amendment Minnesotans will vote on in November estimates changes required by the amendment would cost state and local governments at least $33 million and possibly twice that amount. The Center For Election Integrity Minnesota says individual Minnesotans could spend a similar amount assembling the documents needed to qualify for state-issued IDs.

Justices hear lawyers for administration, Legislature spar over amendment titles

The Dayton administration argues a 1919 law gives the Secretary of State the power to write the titles of Constitutional amendments that appear on the ballot. Lawyers for the Legislature say the Constitution gives lawmakers that authority. Supreme Court justices will need to decide who's right before the end of August, so this fall's ballots can be prepared.

Supreme Court won't extend time limits as lawyers argue amendment titles

Minnesota Supreme Court justices will hear arguments Tuesday about the titles of the Constitutional amendments that will appear on the fall ballot. Backers of the marriage and voter ID amendments want the court to get rid of the titles supplied by Secretary of State Mark Ritchie and restore the original titles the Legislature wrote. The court refused to extend the time limits for attorneys to make their arguments.

ACLU leads challenge to voter ID amendment

The Minnesota Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday afternoon in a lawsuit aimed at keeping the voter ID constitutional amendment off of the statewide ballot. The American Civil Liberties Union of Minnesota, League of Women Voters Minnesota and other anti-amendment groups are asking the court to strike down the ballot question. They claim its wording is too vague and misleading.

Attorney General files court papers saying amendment titles up to Sec. of State

Each side is digging in in the fight over the titles of the proposed Constitutional amendments that will appear on Minnesota's fall ballot. Attorney General Lori Swanson filed papers with the Supreme Court insisting it's up to the Secretary of State to come up with the titles. Meanwhile, a Senate committee scheduled a Friday hearing to question Secretary of State Mark Ritchie about his changes to the titles suggested by the Legislature.

Common Cause files complaint against Minnesota Majority

Common Cause Minnesota, which opposes the ballot measure that would require Minnesotans to show a photo ID before they vote, says its opponents in the voter ID fight, the nonprofit Minnesota Majority, broke state law by not registering its lobbying activities. Minnesota Majority worked with lawmakers to construct a photo ID bill, according to court documents. But Dan McGrath, executive director of Minnesota Majority, scoffed at the complaint.

Critics of Voter ID amendment to court: Legislature is misleading voters

Groups that are challenging the proposed Constitutional amendment that would require an ID to vote filed paperwork with the Minnesota Supreme Court in advance of the hearing later this month. They say if the court approves the ballot question as is, it will send the message that the Legislature is free to mislead or deceive voters.

Billboard slams Minnesota's record on voting fraud

Minnesota's reputation as a squeaky-clean state is under attack. The Minnesota Majority, a conservative group that has campaigned for a strict photo ID requirement, put up a billboard near Elk River that says Minnesota is "number one" in voting fraud. Meanwhile, groups on both sides of the issue are plotting strategy in the run-up to the vote.

Secretary of State: MN needs final word on Voter ID language by late August

Secretary of State Mark Ritchie tells the Minnesota Supreme Court that election officials need to know by August 27th whether the voter ID question will be on the November ballot. The Legislature voted to put the Constitutional amendment before voters. But a lawsuit claims the question is misleading and should be changed or left off the ballot. Justices will hear arguments in the case on July 17th.

Independence Party opposes amendments at state convention

The Minnesota Independence Party held its political convention Saturday in Roseville without endorsing a candidate for U.S. Senate this year, the Associated Press reports. Delegates did pass resolutions opposing the voter ID measure and the marriage amendment that would ban same-sex marriage in Minnesota. Voters will cast their ballots in November.

State hires law firm to argue in favor of Voter ID question

A legislative commission voted to hire a private law firm to defend the voter ID question lawmakers put on this fall's ballot. Next month the Minnesota Supreme Court will hear arguments in a lawsuit that claims the ballot question does not accurately describe the Constitutional amendment that would require an ID to vote.